Webinars



Sessions

PN Safety Series Part 1: Prescribing and Communicating the Parenteral Nutrition Order

Mar 5, 2014 3:00pm ‐ Mar 5, 2014 4:30pm

Identification: PNSS1

Credits: None available.

Because PN administration errors occur at the point of patient contact, mistakes in this phase of the medication delivery process are less likely than other types of PN errors to be intercepted, and more likely to cause harm. Data pertaining to the incidence of errors related to PN administration are scarce. A recent survey revealed that 44% of organizations do not track PN-related medication errors and do not know where in the process errors may be happening.

The literature does provide some insight into the scope of the problem, however. In one prospective observational study of errors associated with parenteral nutrition, 35% of PN-related errors occurred during the administration process. A similar audit of 18,588 PN days in a tertiary pediatric hospital found that administration-related errors accounted for 30% of all PN errors. In addition, case reports of PN-related errors suggest that neonatal and pediatric patients may be most vulnerable to PN administration errors.

The broad range of healthcare settings in which PN administration takes place—from critical care to home care—raises the potential for disparities to exist in the knowledge and skills of the nursing staff responsible for PN administration. Regardless of the setting, or the number of patients receiving the therapy in a given facility, the classification of PN as a high-alert medication requires healthcare organizations to implement measures to provide the infrastructure for safe PN administration, develop evidence-based policies and procedures related to PN administration, and to provide comprehensive education for nursing staff and lay caregivers responsible for delivering this complex form of intravenous therapy.

Objectives:

  • Identify common types of PN administration errors.
  • Describe system-based strategies to enhance the safety of PN administration.
  • List factors that promote or inhibit the use of the PN Safety Consensus Recommendations in the administration phase of PN.
  • Propose action items to promote use of the PN Safety Consensus Recommendations for PN administration.

Speaker(s):
  • Phil Ayers, PharmD, BCNSP, FMSHP, FASHP, Chief, Clinical Pharmacy Services, Department of Pharmacy, Mississippi Baptist Medical Center, Jackson, MS
  • Michael Kraft, PharmD, BCNSP, Assistant Director, Education and Research, Department of Pharmacy Services, University of Michigan Health System; Clinical Professor, University of Michigan College of Pharmacy, Ann Arbor, MI
  • David S. Seres, MD, ScM, PNS, FASPEN, Director Medical Nutrition; Associate Professor of Medicine; Institute of Human Nutrition, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, NY
Standard: $39.00
Members: $19.00

PN Safety Series Part 2: A Systematic Approach to Parenteral Nutrition Order Review and Verification

Mar 12, 2014 3:00pm ‐ Mar 12, 2014 4:30pm

Identification: PNSS2

Credits: None available.

Because PN administration errors occur at the point of patient contact, mistakes in this phase of the medication delivery process are less likely than other types of PN errors to be intercepted, and more likely to cause harm. Data pertaining to the incidence of errors related to PN administration are scarce. A recent survey revealed that 44% of organizations do not track PN-related medication errors and do not know where in the process errors may be happening.

The literature does provide some insight into the scope of the problem, however. In one prospective observational study of errors associated with parenteral nutrition, 35% of PN-related errors occurred during the administration process. A similar audit of 18,588 PN days in a tertiary pediatric hospital found that administration-related errors accounted for 30% of all PN errors. In addition, case reports of PN-related errors suggest that neonatal and pediatric patients may be most vulnerable to PN administration errors.

The broad range of healthcare settings in which PN administration takes place—from critical care to home care—raises the potential for disparities to exist in the knowledge and skills of the nursing staff responsible for PN administration. Regardless of the setting, or the number of patients receiving the therapy in a given facility, the classification of PN as a high-alert medication requires healthcare organizations to implement measures to provide the infrastructure for safe PN administration, develop evidence-based policies and procedures related to PN administration, and to provide comprehensive education for nursing staff and lay caregivers responsible for delivering this complex form of intravenous therapy.

Objectives:

  • Identify common types of PN administration errors.
  • Describe system-based strategies to enhance the safety of PN administration.
  • List factors that promote or inhibit the use of the PN Safety Consensus Recommendations in the administration phase of PN.
  • Propose action items to promote use of the PN Safety Consensus Recommendations for PN administration.

Speaker(s):
  • Phil Ayers, PharmD, BCNSP, FMSHP, FASHP, Chief, Clinical Pharmacy Services, Department of Pharmacy, Mississippi Baptist Medical Center, Jackson, MS
  • Beverly Holcombe, PharmD, BCNSP, FASHP, FASPEN, Clinical Practice Specialist, American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN)
Speaker(s):
  • Jane Gervasio, PharmD, BCNSP, Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Butler University, Indianapolis, IN
Standard: $39.00
Members: $19.00

PN Safety Series Part 3: Compounding Parenteral Nutrition Solutions

Mar 19, 2014 3:00pm ‐ Mar 19, 2014 4:30pm

Identification: PNSS3

Credits: None available.

Because PN administration errors occur at the point of patient contact, mistakes in this phase of the medication delivery process are less likely than other types of PN errors to be intercepted, and more likely to cause harm. Data pertaining to the incidence of errors related to PN administration are scarce. A recent survey revealed that 44% of organizations do not track PN-related medication errors and do not know where in the process errors may be happening.

The literature does provide some insight into the scope of the problem, however. In one prospective observational study of errors associated with parenteral nutrition, 35% of PN-related errors occurred during the administration process. A similar audit of 18,588 PN days in a tertiary pediatric hospital found that administration-related errors accounted for 30% of all PN errors. In addition, case reports of PN-related errors suggest that neonatal and pediatric patients may be most vulnerable to PN administration errors.

The broad range of healthcare settings in which PN administration takes place—from critical care to home care—raises the potential for disparities to exist in the knowledge and skills of the nursing staff responsible for PN administration. Regardless of the setting, or the number of patients receiving the therapy in a given facility, the classification of PN as a high-alert medication requires healthcare organizations to implement measures to provide the infrastructure for safe PN administration, develop evidence-based policies and procedures related to PN administration, and to provide comprehensive education for nursing staff and lay caregivers responsible for delivering this complex form of intravenous therapy.

Objectives:

  • Identify common types of PN administration errors.
  • Describe system-based strategies to enhance the safety of PN administration.
  • List factors that promote or inhibit the use of the PN Safety Consensus Recommendations in the administration phase of PN.
  • Propose action items to promote use of the PN Safety Consensus Recommendations for PN administration.

Speaker(s):
  • Gordon Sacks, PharmD, BCNSP, FASPEN, FCCP, Professor and Head, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Auburn University Harrison School of Pharmacy, Auburn, AL
  • Phil Ayers, PharmD, BCNSP, FMSHP, FASHP, Chief, Clinical Pharmacy Services, Department of Pharmacy, Mississippi Baptist Medical Center, Jackson, MS
  • Joseph Boullata, PharmD, RPh, CNS-S, FASPEN, FACN, Pharmacy Specialist in Nutrition Support, Clinical Nutrition Support Services, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
Standard: $39.00
Members: $19.00

PN Safety Series Part 4: Strategies to Optimize Safety during Parenteral Nutrition Administration

Mar 26, 2014 3:00pm ‐ Mar 26, 2014 4:00pm

Identification: PNSS4

Credits: None available.

Because PN administration errors occur at the point of patient contact, mistakes in this phase of the medication delivery process are less likely than other types of PN errors to be intercepted, and more likely to cause harm. Data pertaining to the incidence of errors related to PN administration are scarce. A recent survey revealed that 44% of organizations do not track PN-related medication errors and do not know where in the process errors may be happening.

The literature does provide some insight into the scope of the problem, however. In one prospective observational study of errors associated with parenteral nutrition, 35% of PN-related errors occurred during the administration process. A similar audit of 18,588 PN days in a tertiary pediatric hospital found that administration-related errors accounted for 30% of all PN errors. In addition, case reports of PN-related errors suggest that neonatal and pediatric patients may be most vulnerable to PN administration errors.

The broad range of healthcare settings in which PN administration takes place—from critical care to home care—raises the potential for disparities to exist in the knowledge and skills of the nursing staff responsible for PN administration. Regardless of the setting, or the number of patients receiving the therapy in a given facility, the classification of PN as a high-alert medication requires healthcare organizations to implement measures to provide the infrastructure for safe PN administration, develop evidence-based policies and procedures related to PN administration, and to provide comprehensive education for nursing staff and lay caregivers responsible for delivering this complex form of intravenous therapy.

Objectives:

  • Identify common types of PN administration errors.
  • Describe system-based strategies to enhance the safety of PN administration.
  • List factors that promote or inhibit the use of the PN Safety Consensus Recommendations in the administration phase of PN.
  • Propose action items to promote use of the PN Safety Consensus Recommendations for PN administration.

Speaker(s):
  • Phil Ayers, PharmD, BCNSP, FMSHP, FASHP, Chief, Clinical Pharmacy Services, Department of Pharmacy, Mississippi Baptist Medical Center, Jackson, MS
  • Patricia Worthington, MS, RN, CNSC, Nutrition Support Clinical Specialist, Jefferson University Hospitals, Philadelphia, PA
Standard: $39.00
Members: $19.00

Is Your Patient's Tank on Empty? Implementing the PEP uP Protocol in your Critical Care Unit

Apr 2, 2014 12:00pm ‐ Apr 2, 2014 1:30pm

Identification: WEB140402

Credits: None available.

Back by popular demand! Dr. Heyland will present new information in this upcoming webinar.

Enteral Nutrition is the preferred route of providing nutrients and is accepted as standard of care in critically ill patient. Historically, feeding protocols have been used to guide the delivery of enteral nutrition. They frequently utilize conservative, reactionary approaches to optimizing nutrition that are not grounded in evidence but rather, seem to have evolved over time. This program will review common barriers to providing adequate nutrition to critically ill patients and potential strategies to overcome these barriers. Included will be a review of the Enhanced Protein-Energy Provision via the Enteral Route Feeding Protocol – PEP uP Protocol. This innovative approach to feeding the critically ill patient as well as new approaches to educational intervention with healthcare staff will be introduced during this session.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify common types of PN administration errors.
  • Describe system-based strategies to enhance the safety of PN administration.
  • List factors that promote or inhibit the use of the PN Safety Consensus Recommendations in the administration phase of PN.
  • Propose action items to promote use of the PN Safety Consensus Recommendations for PN administration.

Speaker(s):
  • Daren K. Heyland, MD, MSc, Director, Clinical Evaluation Research Unit, Kingston General Hospital; Director, The Canadian Researchers at the End of Life Network; Director, Critical Care Nutrition, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada
  • Karrie Derenski, PharmD, BCNSP, BCCCP, CNSC, Pharmacy and Metabolic Support Supervisor; Residency Director PGY2, CoxHealth, Springfield, MO
Standard: $39.00
Members: $19.00

Malnutrition Matters in the ICU: Impact of Pre-Existing Malnutrition and Intervention Strategies

Apr 8, 2014 1:00pm ‐ Apr 8, 2014 2:30pm

Identification: WEB140408

Credits: None available.

Nutrition support practitioners have long understood the negative impact of malnutrition on patient outcomes. Smaller studies have reported conflicting data about the magnitude and impact of malnutrition and patient outcomes. This is particularly true in studies focusing on obese patients. This session will provide an overview of novel outcome studies obtained from large administrative datasets indicating that preexisting malnutrition, identified through a comprehensive nutrition assessment conducted by a registered dietitian, contributes to poor outcomes in critically ill patients. The impact of protein-calorie malnutrition, obesity, and vitamin D deficiency on bloodstream infection, sepsis, acute kidney injury, and mortality will be presented. Potential mechanisms will be discussed and intervention strategies will be explored.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify three negative outcomes associated with preexisting malnutrition in critically ill patients
  • Explain why obesity is not protective in all critically ill patients
  • Identify two interventions to improve delivery of nutrition support to critically ill patients

Speaker(s):
  • Kris M. Mogensen, MS, RD-AP, LDN, CNSC, Team Leader Dietitian, Department of Nutrition, Brigham and Women's Hospital; Instructor, Boston University, Boston, MA
  • Kenneth B. Christopher, MD, SM, Assistant Program Director, Internal Medicine Residency Program, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston MA
  • Malcolm Robinson, MD, CNSP, Assistant Professor of Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital
  • Edward Saltzman, MD, Chief, Division of Clinical Nutrition; Director, Adult Nutrition Support Services; Chair, Department of Nutrition Sciences; Associate Professor, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University, Boston, MA
Standard: $39.00
Members: $19.00

Raising Awareness: New Enteral Connectors

Apr 30, 2014 1:00pm ‐ Apr 30, 2014 2:00pm

Identification: WEB140430

Credits: None available.

In 2014, the new ISO enteral connector design will be transitioned into devices in the marketplace. Enteral only components of the EN delivery system will change practice, thus policies, procedures, and processes will need to be modified. Clinicians, caregivers, and patients will need to understand why this patient safety initiative has happened, what practices will be impacted, how whole institutions and agencies will need to be aware throughout the supply chain, what steps make up the transition plan, and what will be the timeline for this industry wide change. These new connectors will impact nurses, dietitians, physicians, pharmacists, caregivers and patients across the healthcare spectrum. This phased program series is designed to educate clinicians, healthcare personnel, and caregivers/patients involved in any way with enteral nutrition.

This first program will be an overview designed to raise awareness about these upcoming changes, about how the healthcare system can prepare for this change, and how teams at institutions and agencies can begin planning for this new system. Issues about the new connectors including definitions, regulatory and system wide language, impact and timing will be included. These new connectors will modify enteral nutrition, hydration, and medication delivery.

Communication around these changes is being handled by GEDSA.

GEDSA is also working with a core group of stakeholders including FDA, ISMP, A.S.P.E.N., The Joint Commission, Premier Safety Institute, Novation, National Patient Safety Foundation, AVA, and Medication Safety Collaborative. GEDSA Stay Connected 2014 brochure is attached.

Learning objectives:

  • Explain why new enteral connector design standards are needed.
  • Describe features of the new enteral connector standards and their safety implications.
  • Outline the timeline for new connector design implementation and transition.Discuss the new connector impact on medication delivery safety
  • Discuss the new connector impact on medication delivery safety.

Speaker(s):
  • Ainsley Malone, MS, RD, LD, CNSC, FAND, FASPEN, Nutrition Support Dietitian, Nutrition Support Team, Mt. Carmel East Hospital, New Albany, OH
  • Peggi Guenter, PhD, RN, FAAN, FASPEN, Senior Director of Clinical Practice, Quality, and Advocacy, American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, Silver Spring, MD
  • Joseph Boullata, PharmD, RPh, CNS-S, FASPEN, FACN, Pharmacy Specialist in Nutrition Support, Clinical Nutrition Support Services, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
Standard: $39.00
Members: $19.00

Fundamentals of Fluid, Electrolytes and Acid-Base Disorders: Part 1 – Fluids and Electrolytes

May 7, 2014 4:00pm ‐ May 7, 2014 5:30pm

Identification: WEB140507

Credits: None available.

Fluid, electrolyte, and acid- base disturbances are very common in critically ill patients and can contribute significantly to morbidity and mortality. A sound understanding of this complex topic area is vital for optimal patient management. This two-part webinar series is designed to provide the clinician with an overview of these disturbances as well as an opportunity to assess their knowledge in this area. Interactive case examples allow a hands on approach to patient assessment, management, and problem-solving.

Learning objectives:

  • Describe the function, distribution, and regulation of fluid in the body.
  • Identify the role of sodium, potassium, phosphate, calcium, and magnesium in the body.
  • Discuss the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of fluid and electrolyte imbalances.

Speaker(s):
  • Phil Ayers, PharmD, BCNSP, FMSHP, FASHP, Chief, Clinical Pharmacy Services, Department of Pharmacy, Mississippi Baptist Medical Center, Jackson, MS
  • Todd Canada, PharmD, BCNSP, BCCCP, FASHP, FTSHP, Nutrition Support Team Coordinator, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Division of Pharmacy, Houston, TX
  • Jane Hughes, PharmD, BCNSP, BC-ADM, VA Boston Healthcare System
  • Harlan Husted, PharmD, MBA, BCPS, Pediatric Clinical Pharmacist, NICU, Community Regional Medical Center, Fresno, CA
Standard: $39.00
Members: $19.00

Fundamentals of Fluid, Electrolytes and Acid-Base Disorders: Part 2 – Blood Gas Analysis and Acid-Base Disorders  

May 21, 2014 4:00pm ‐ May 21, 2014 5:30pm

Identification: WEB140521

Credits: None available.

Fluid, electrolyte, and acid- base disturbances are very common in critically ill patients and can contribute significantly to morbidity and mortality. A sound understanding of this complex topic area is vital for optimal patient management. This two-part webinar series is designed to provide the clinician with an overview of these disturbances as well as an opportunity to assess their knowledge in this area. Interactive case examples allow a hands on approach to patient assessment, management, and problem-solving.

Learning objectives:

  • Describe acid base regulation in the body.
  • Describe the underlying etiology and pathophysiology of acid base disorders.
  • Identify a step-wise systematic approach to assessing and managing acid-base disorders.

Speaker(s):
  • Jane Hughes, PharmD, BCNSP, BC-ADM, VA Boston Healthcare System
  • Harlan Husted, PharmD, MBA, BCPS, Pediatric Clinical Pharmacist, NICU, Community Regional Medical Center, Fresno, CA
Speaker(s):
Standard: $39.00
Members: $19.00

Alternative Lipid Emulsions:  Energy Source versus Therapeutic Modality 

Jun 18, 2014 4:00pm ‐ Jun 18, 2014 5:30pm

Identification: WEB140618

Credits: None available.

Until recently, little thought has been given about the composition of the parenteral lipid emulsions available to U. S. practitioners. With the publication of the A.S.P.E.N. position paper, "Clinical role for alternative intravenous fat emulsions," and the availability of newer lipid emulsions, practitioners now want to learn more of what is common to all these products and how significant these differences really are. This program will provide an overview of intravenous lipid emulsions, discuss the importance of the types of oil, and lastly how these differences can impact complications such as PN associated liver disease and what practitioners can do to minimize them.

Learning objectives:

  1. Describe pros and cons of different oils used in IV fat emulsions
  2. Review parenteral nutrition associated liver disease (PNALD)
  3. Discuss the impact of IV fat emulsion products on PNALD progression

Speaker(s):
  • Kathleen M. Gura, PharmD, BCNSP, FASHP, FPPAG, Pharmacy Clinical Research Program Manager, Boston Children's Hospital; Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
Tags: webinar
Standard: $39.00
Members: $19.00
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